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Author Topic: strike temperature  (Read 3780 times)

Offline Scott

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strike temperature
« on: January 21, 2015, 11:37:38 AM »
My brewing partner and I did our first 15 gallon on Monday night, up to now we had done 5 gallon. I would heat the strike water to 175, transfer to the picnic cooler add the grain and hit around 156 d. This time we heated the strike water to 175 in the mash tun, then added the grain, in hindsight I should have realized there wouldn't be as much temperature loss. I'm just wondering if anyone that uses that method could suggest a good strike water temperature. I think we hit around 167 and had to scramble to get some ice in to cool it off. I'm guessing a strike temp of 165 or so?

Offline blisster

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2015, 12:03:16 PM »
Hi Scott,

A few different factors come into play here:

The amount of grains being added (weight)
Starting temperature of the grains
How much strike water you are adding (water to grain ratio)
Is your mashtun pre-warmed (recommended)

Beersmith has a built-in calculator tool in it that works really well.. Usually end up within a degree or two of the desired mash temperature.

There are some online calculators too but not sure how accurate they are:
http://www.brewblogger.net/?page=tools&section=strike
http://www.brewheads.com/strike.php

 :cheers:
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Offline Two Wheeler

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2015, 12:04:18 PM »
Yikes... likely going to finish much higher FG than you planned.

Do you use Beersmith? I find it's quite accurate helping me with strike temps. If you do use this, change the mash profile to 165 to see how the FG is going to play out.

I know Jake is a big fan of the Green Bay Rackers tool  http://www.rackers.org/calcs.shtml
Jordan Harris
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Offline Scott

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2015, 01:19:16 PM »
I just started using beersmith, in fact I haven't even set up the equipment profile for the new system.  I didn't realize beersmith had a calculator for that. I'll check it out. Thanks for the tip.

Offline Scott

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2015, 01:50:25 PM »
Yikes... likely going to finish much higher FG than you planned.

Do you use Beersmith? I find it's quite accurate helping me with strike temps. If you do use this, change the mash profile to 165 to see how the FG is going to play out.

I know Jake is a big fan of the Green Bay Rackers tool  http://www.rackers.org/calcs.shtml
It took around 15 minutes of adding ice and stirring to get down to 157 d, which is still about 5 d higher than I wanted. so 3/4 of the hour was 5 degrees to high and 1/4 was 15 degrees....not sure how to input that in beersmith :frazzled:

Offline Two Wheeler

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2015, 02:20:30 PM »
Unfortunately, from everything I have read, is that conversion is mostly done in 15 mins. It will still be beer though!  :cheers:

Beersmith is a pain to figure out, but once you get your equipment profile set up it's too easy. On the recipe design page, you choose which mash profile you want (light, med, heavy body) and how you mash (biab, batch sparge, fly sparge) and then it will use your equipment standards to figure out the temp. I do BIAB and it's always within a degree for me.

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Offline Jake

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2015, 03:01:22 PM »
Easiest website I've ever used is "Green Bay Rackers" ... still use it from time to time when I don't have beersmith handy

Google "Green Bay Rackers Mash Calculator". If you input your grain to water ratio and desired strike temp, it spits out the strike temp. I always go about 2 degrees higher than recommended and I'm ALWAYS within a degree here. Works well for me and super easy to use.
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Offline robcoombs

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2015, 03:18:41 PM »
The equipment profile setup is very important to dialing in your water temp, and volumes. Get that set up and you'll get much better results. Also, whenever changing toa new system it will take a few brews to dial evrything in. What did you brew for the 15gal batch?

Offline Scott

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2015, 05:49:34 PM »
The equipment profile setup is very important to dialing in your water temp, and volumes. Get that set up and you'll get much better results. Also, whenever changing toa new system it will take a few brews to dial evrything in. What did you brew for the 15gal batch?
Doing the Lunch clone again, but with the cascade for centennial sub. Yup Beersmith and me need to spend some time together

Offline robcoombs

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2015, 05:52:55 PM »
Yeah that high of a mash temp is going to be problematic for that beer. Pretty sure I used 149 for the Lunch clone. Who knows though, it may be fine, just not what you're expecting. Like @Two Wheeler said it will still be beer. 

Offline Scott

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2015, 05:56:23 PM »
Easiest website I've ever used is "Green Bay Rackers" ... still use it from time to time when I don't have beersmith handy

Google "Green Bay Rackers Mash Calculator". If you input your grain to water ratio and desired strike temp, it spits out the strike temp. I always go about 2 degrees higher than recommended and I'm ALWAYS within a degree here. Works well for me and super easy to use.
thanks, had a look at it, you're right very easy.

Offline Scott

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2015, 09:44:22 PM »
Yikes... likely going to finish much higher FG than you planned.

Do you use Beersmith? I find it's quite accurate helping me with strike temps. If you do use this, change the mash profile to 165 to see how the FG is going to play out.

I know Jake is a big fan of the Green Bay Rackers tool  http://www.rackers.org/calcs.shtml

As you predicted it looks like we finished high at 1.016 OG was 1.054.....We'll drink it. I'll bring some to the next meeting.

Offline Two Wheeler

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2015, 09:46:35 PM »
That shouldn't be too bad!
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Offline robcoombs

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2015, 10:46:41 PM »
Not bad at all. Certainly could have finished much higher with that mash temp.

Offline Scott

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Re: strike temperature
« Reply #14 on: January 28, 2015, 08:37:34 AM »
Update on this one, my brewing partner said the airlock stopped blurping on day 5, he checked the SG on day 5, 6 & 7 steady at 1.016. He dry hopped on day 7 and the airlock started going again. Just got a message from him that today, day 8, the SG is down to 1.013 and still fermenting although slowly. Any thought on why the ferm. stopped for 3 days then started again when dry hops were added?