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Author Topic: Mashing  (Read 1763 times)

Offline Jake

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Mashing
« on: November 22, 2011, 04:17:58 PM »
Does anyone in here start with the mash water already in the cooler and slowly add/stir the grain into the water? I've always added water onto the grain in a couple different doses and stirred. Just read that it's alot easier to mix grain into water because it's alot less likely that clumps will form.

I never thought of doing it this way ... just seems backwards
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Offline fakr

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Re: Mashing
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2011, 05:11:05 PM »
Hey Jake,

I do that.  I put about 1/2 my mash water in, then slowly add my grain and stir with a mash paddle, then add another 1/4 of the water and check my temp.  If it's way too low, boil up the rest of the water and add...if it's too high, I can add colder water. Works for me.  

I would have thought if you put in all the grain first then added water that you'd end up with big clumps of grain.
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Offline Dave Savoie

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Re: Mashing
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2011, 05:17:42 PM »
I do that dump all my water in and slowly add my grain stiring lightly to avoid any clumps at all has never failed me
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Offline Richard

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Re: Mashing
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2011, 05:47:12 PM »
I just add all the water to the grain, never had any major issues.
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Offline Kyle

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Re: Mashing
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2011, 09:06:17 PM »
I've tried the variations mentioned here. The way I find leaves the fewest dough balls is to add about a half inch of water on the bottom of the mash tun before putting the grian in, and continuously running the water in while adding the grain.
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Offline Jake

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Re: Mashing
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2011, 10:07:36 PM »
I typically just added the water on top of all the grain, and it seemed I would always be within a degree of my target. I tried starting with the water in the mash tun, and undershot the temp by like 4 degrees ... guess it's going to be a dry beer

Gave it another 15 mins in the mash tun also. I read that it takes a little longer at lower temps. So mashed for almost an hour and a half just to be safe. Mash temp was closer to 149 and I was aiming for 153
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Offline fakr

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Re: Mashing
« Reply #6 on: November 23, 2011, 10:36:42 AM »
Jake, you saw that big of a difference in temperature drops between the two methods?  That's interesting.  I guess the grain in the mash tun would maybe act as an insulation to keep the heat in as you add the water?

I also noticed quite a drop in temp when putting water in first, then adding grain.  I usually have to go 4 to 5 degrees above sparge temp calculations so I've just adjusted my routine accordingly.

Maybe I will try the "grain first" technique and see what happens.
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Offline DandyMason

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Re: Mashing
« Reply #7 on: November 23, 2011, 10:52:04 AM »
Not that im overly experienced with it... But I do what kyle mentioned (likely because I learned from him). Add grain as the water fills the mash tun.