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Author Topic: Cold Crashing  (Read 6292 times)

Offline Chris Craig

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Cold Crashing
« on: July 31, 2013, 07:45:33 PM »
I just kegged some of my Rye beer tonight.  I had it in the freezer cold-crashing for 3 days with gelatine.  There was a noticeable layer of what looks to be yeast on top of the trub.  This made a huge difference.  I should have taken a picture beside the other carboy.  It was noticeably clearer.  This will be common practice for me from now on.

Offline Chris Craig

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2013, 07:46:00 PM »
Will be ready for the meeting on Saturday.  Hopefully it's good!

Offline fakr

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2013, 07:55:17 PM »
I'm a big fan of gelatin too.   It's so simple to do and so worth it.

I've done a comparison between 2 kegs of ipa, and 2 kegs of pale ale.  Other than the clarity difference, there was a very small difference in mouthfeel and hop flavor.  The difference was so slight though that I wouldn't hesitate to use gelatin in any beer I make...other than really dark beers of course.
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Offline chrismccull

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2013, 08:23:00 PM »
How much do you use Joe?

Offline Waterlogged

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2013, 10:04:23 PM »
I have a cloudy pale ale I ant to cold crash before keging (first keg).  What is the process for adding gelatin?
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Offline Chris Craig

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2013, 10:18:12 PM »
Buy some unflavored Knox gelatin from the grocery store. Boil 1/2 cup of water and add it to 1/2 teaspoon of gelatine powder. Stir until it's dissolved. Add it to the already cold keg or carboy. No need to stir. Let it sit cold for a few days, then proceed as usual.

Offline fakr

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2013, 09:16:34 AM »
Buy some unflavored Knox gelatin from the grocery store. Boil 1/2 cup of water and add it to 1/2 teaspoon of gelatine powder. Stir until it's dissolved. Add it to the already cold keg or carboy. No need to stir. Let it sit cold for a few days, then proceed as usual.

Like Chris said.  I personally shake the crap out of my kegs when I force carb, so I do technically stir the gelatin in.

When I spund and the beer is already cold and carbed in the fermenter, I add gelatin to the keg before filling the keg. Once full, give the keg a little shake then let it sit a couple of days.

"If God had intended for us to drink beer, He would have given us stomachs."

Offline brew

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2013, 09:22:55 AM »
So does it make a difference if you add the gelatin to cold or warm fermentor / keg?
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Offline fakr

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2013, 09:27:52 AM »
I've added gelatin to a warm keg of beer, then cold crashed it, and it didn't seem to clear things up much. 
I'd suggest kegging, cold crashing, then gelatin, then carbonate.
"If God had intended for us to drink beer, He would have given us stomachs."

Offline brew

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2013, 09:37:18 AM »
So you don't rack it off the gelatin? Just serve through it? How long between the gelatin and carbonate step? Or do you hook up the C02 at the same time you add the Gelatin? Sorry for the fifth degree I'm just trying to decide when I should try this. Generally when I keg it goes right into the fridge at 30psi for 2 days. Wondering if I should add gelatin after I keg or after the 2 days - I'd hate to add another step to the process by waiting to carbonate after adding gelatin, but if you think it makes a difference I might try it...
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Offline Chris Craig

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2013, 09:57:04 AM »
Brew, you can do it any which way you like, and it'll work the same.  As long as the beer is cold when you add gelatine and let it sit for at least 2 days, you'll be good.  Of course, the advantage of doing this in the carboy instead of the keg is that you leave all the trub behind, and you can move the keg around without kicking up sediment.

Offline fakr

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2013, 10:06:59 AM »
Brew, I guess the only thing that would change in your process is cold crashing the keg and adding the gelatin before hooking up the CO2. 
All the gelatin and crud will sink to the very bottom and you rack it out just by pouring the first glass of beer from the keg.  You've never seen crap come out of a keg like when you pour your first "gelatin" glass.  It's thick and opaque, then turns bright and clear all of a sudden.

If I was to do this with multiple kegs at a time, lets say 4, I would add the gelatin, carbonate, then hook up a party tap to each keg and rack the gelatin out, then leave them for when I want to tap them....that way they are all clean and ready to go, no worries about agitating the gelatin at the bottom of a keg while in transit.

I think if you start doing this Brew, you'll quickly and easily make it just another part of kegging beer.
"If God had intended for us to drink beer, He would have given us stomachs."

Offline brew

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2013, 11:41:57 AM »
Yup gotta try this. Normally its takes a week or two of pouring for my beer to get pretty clear and any moving the keg (say taking to the cottage) stirs it up pretty good.

I'd love to cold crash and gelatin my secondary, but carboys really hog fridge space and using kegs for secondaries means a less than full serving keg (I dunno, I just cant seem to get past not having a full keg in the fridge - why is that?)

I think I'll try it both ways, putting gelatin in freshly kegged uncarbonated beer (no added steps to my current process) and putting gelatin in after carbing / crashing is complete. Next batch maybe I'll try adding a 2 day gelatin step between kegging and carbing as well...

I have a keg now that's almost done its second day of carbing at 30psi. If I put gelatin in it now, how long do you think until it settles out? (how long would you wait to start pouring it?) - I have to move it to the cottage tonight...

Chris - do you think adding gelatin to un-cold-crashed batch will still work once its put in the fridge? Or does it just drop out without doing anything?
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Offline Chris Craig

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2013, 12:05:47 PM »
I give it 2 days to settle.  My understanding is you need the beer to be cold because that's when the chill haze forms.  The gelatin attaches to those particles due to the opposite charge.  Then they're heavy enough to sink quickly.

Offline brew

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Re: Cold Crashing
« Reply #14 on: August 01, 2013, 01:59:32 PM »
Cool thanks for the info...
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