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Author Topic: Rhizomes  (Read 13079 times)

Offline Alain2

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #15 on: March 31, 2016, 11:20:53 AM »
Everwood Ave brew shop is now selling rhizomes.

You can pre-order now

http://www.everwoodavebrewshop.com/category-s/366.htm

Offline Two Wheeler

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #16 on: March 31, 2016, 11:42:56 AM »
Awesome, just ordered Cascade, Centennial and Goldings.

Should I start these in buckets first, or straight into the ground?
Jordan Harris
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Offline Roger

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2016, 12:03:43 AM »
Personaly I'd put them in the ground when any risk of frost is gone. Make sure you have good fertile soil and good drainage. Also you'll want as much southern facing exposure as possible. This is what has worked for me anyways.  :cheers:

Offline ECH

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2016, 02:30:11 AM »
Depends on how far in advance you get them. This year is an anomaly for weather, yet still too soon to put them out. No reason why you can't put them in pots now, in a sunny window, and then transplant them outside when the weather is right.

Be cautious though as they can grow fast inside, which makes them delicate when transplanting. I lost 2 Mt. Hood when transplanting because the bines got pinched.

And the ones I got last year, I waited too long to plant them (not wanting to take a risk of growing them inside and then having the bines pinched again) as we still had about 6ft of snow in the backyard this time last year, and when I finally did plant them in pots, they were already dead, and got no growth.

I have grown them in pots for the last 2 yrs, didn't get crazy yield off of them last year, but enough off of a couple 2nd yr plants for a batch. However they are going in the ground as soon as I can safely get them there.

Just got 2 Centennial and 2 Cascade from "my guy" out west, they will get potted tomorrow, and then probably transplanted outside end of April depending on the weather. These will go along with my 2 Chinook, a Fuggles and a Golding.

Offline HopHead

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #19 on: April 08, 2016, 12:21:12 PM »
Put my order in through Everwood. Was told that they will ship late next week. FYI.  :)
Richard

Offline Two Wheeler

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2016, 02:45:23 PM »
Got my rhizomes on Friday!

Are they safe to go in the ground yet?

Jordan Harris
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Offline Roger

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #21 on: April 18, 2016, 04:44:47 PM »
I'd say as long as the ground is soft you can get your mounds ready and plant them. Might not be a bad idea to tent them with some plastic vapour barrier or some black garbage bags when there's any chane of frost.
But then again I usually have a black thumb...
 ;)

Offline ECH

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #22 on: April 19, 2016, 02:49:10 AM »
I go by my Grandfather whom has had a garden for the last 40 or so years (this will be his first without), and he wouldn't put anything like a tomato or cuke plant out until end of April, because you just never know what weather we will get.

I would pretty much treat hops the same way.

You could get away with a black plastic tent if you do have to put them out now. It would help warm the soil around the plant as well. Contemplating putting black plastic down in the fall and covering with mulch for the winter. Come spring, just clear off the mulch from the plastic closes to the plant and let the sun to the rest, it would heat up the ground quicker in the spring. Don't know that I would leave it over the summer, as it might cook them.

Offline shazapple

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2016, 05:17:01 PM »
Thanks for the rhizomes Roger! Finally got them planted today. Used my PhD to dig the holes and filled them with a mix of topsoil and compost. I was aiming for a 14ft pole but ended up with a 20ft once the Cedar tree was cut and limbed. I installed eyelets at the top and  plan to run bailer twine up to the shackle then normal rope through the eyelets and  down so I can lower everything at the end of the year. 

I have a second post installed as well for the centennial rhizomes coming next week.   :cheers:
« Last Edit: May 01, 2016, 07:32:10 PM by shazapple »
Lee

Offline Scott

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2016, 11:15:57 AM »
Used my PhD to dig the holes



ha, sounds like a Fred Eaglesmith song  :)

Offline Two Wheeler

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #25 on: May 11, 2016, 04:33:18 PM »
Mine have been in the ground for about 2 weeks and no sign of life yet.

I dug a hole in an existing planter bed, filled with potting soil and laid in the rhizome, then I covered back up with the topsoil and mulch. Would the mulch be inhibiting growth?

Also, should I be watering these things daily?

#blackthumb
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Offline shazapple

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #26 on: May 11, 2016, 04:44:50 PM »
Some of mine already had leaves so those ones are growing like mad. The others I buried a couple inches down with the tip of the sprout just peaking out of the soil and they are only just getting going.

It's been fairly cool so I've only watered mine a couple times a week but they will need more during summer. I poke my finger in the ground to see if the soil is dry.

Edit: the above refer to the rhizomes I got from Roger, which were 6" or more. The ones I ordered off the internet were only 1-2" long, so I suspect they would need a little more time to get established. I planted them yesterday in the same manner as above.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2016, 04:51:06 PM by shazapple »
Lee

Offline Roger

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #27 on: May 11, 2016, 06:30:00 PM »
Mine have been in the ground for about 2 weeks and no sign of life yet.

I dug a hole in an existing planter bed, filled with potting soil and laid in the rhizome, then I covered back up with the topsoil and mulch. Would the mulch be inhibiting growth?

Also, should I be watering these things daily?

#blackthumb
You have been watering them though right? Dont over water them or you might cause root rot. Mulch shouldn't harm them. Are you using dyed mulch? That might not be good for them but still shouldn't kill them. Give them time they should be fine.

Offline nagirroc

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #28 on: May 11, 2016, 07:13:02 PM »
Flowers are planted.

Offline Al-Loves-Wine

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Re: Rhizomes
« Reply #29 on: May 11, 2016, 07:45:49 PM »
Mine have been in the ground for about 2 weeks and no sign of life yet.

I dug a hole in an existing planter bed, filled with potting soil and laid in the rhizome, then I covered back up with the topsoil and mulch. Would the mulch be inhibiting growth?

Also, should I be watering these things daily?

#blackthumb

What strains did you plant, Jordan? I planted 7 new varieties last year, and a few were very slow to come. Goldings are quite slow, as with Nugget Willamette, Mt. Hood and Galena. Cascade was a bit slow for me first year as well. However this year the Nugget and Columbus are currently all about 3+ inches now. Columbus is no surprise though, its a super hardy high yielding variety.

I personally like to broadcast a little lime on the soil and let precipitation do the rest. As Roger mentioned you will definitely get rot/mildew if you over water, but once they are out of the ground and going good don't be shy. Especially when they come into flower!

A friend of mine has built several permaculture beds for his hops, and I can say for his first year his were very impressive.